Singles


Give Me One More Chance 45
“Give Me One More Chance” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Jin Records J-7354, 1958, written by D. Stich (Dave Allen), Flat Town Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Butch Perkins, tenor saxophone: Miller (Jimmy) Norman, bass: Lee Hamby, drums: Tom Martin. Producer Floyd Soileau ran Jin Records in conjunction with the Swallow label from Ville Platte, Louisiana. The name “Jin” was derived from his wife’s first name, Jinver. Dave’s first single, backed with…
Rose Mary 45
“Rose Mary,” a.k.a. “Rose Marie” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Jin Records J-7355, 1958, written by D. Stich (Dave Allen), Flat Town Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, tenor saxophone: Miller (Jimmy) Norman, bass: Lee Hamby, drums: Nick Ortega.

My Broken Heart 45 “My Broken Heart” by Rockin’ Dave Allen and His Thunderbirds, Jin Records J-7372, 1958, written by D. Stich (Dave Allen), Flat Town Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, tenor saxophone: Miller (Jimmy) Norman, alto saxophone: Tim Taylor, baritone saxophone: Vernon Drozd, trombone: Brian McWhirter, bass: Lee Hamby, drums: Tom Martin. Dave’s second single and his first hit, backed with…
What's Left For  A Fool 45
“What’s Left for a Fool,” a.k.a. “What’s Left for a Fool Like Me,” a.k.a. “A Fool Like Me” by Rockin’ Dave Allen and His Thunderbirds, Jin Records J-7373, 1958, written by D. Stich and K. Lund (Dave Allen and Kenny Lund), Flat Town Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, tenor saxophone: Miller (Jimmy) Norman, alto saxophone: Tim Taylor, baritone saxophone: Vernon Drozd, trombone: Brian McWhirter, bass: Lee Hamby, drums: Tom Martin.

Shirley Jean
“Shirley Jean” by Rockin’ Dave Allen and (the) Thunderbirds, Jin Records J-7384, 1960, written by W. Price (“Big” Walter Price), Lion Publishing. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, tenor saxophone: Bobby Claridy, bass: Bill Smith, drums: Tom Martin. Dave’s third single and his second hit, backed with…
Can't Stand To See You Go
“Can’t Stand to See You Go” by Rockin’ Dave Allen and (the) Thunderbirds, Jin Records J-7384 (sic), 1960, written by Jimmy Reed, Conrad Publishing. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, bass: Bill Smith, drums: Tom Martin, harmonica: Joey Long. Dave’s first recording that indisputably falls into the blues genre. Joey Long was a blues guitarist from Louisiana, nine years Dave’s senior, who was an early and notable presence on the Texas music scene. This recording has been frequently anthologized on compact disc in recent years.

Walking Slowly
“Walking Slowly” by Rockin’ Dave Allen and the Thunderbirds, Jin Records J-7392, 1960, written by E.C. King, BMI. Earl Connelly King, who released this song as a single in 1957, is not to be confused with Earl King of New Orleans, a more well-known songwriter and performer. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, tenor saxophones: Miller (Jimmy) Norman and Tim Taylor, trombones: Vernon Drozd and Brian McWhirter, bass: Howard Cox, drums: Tom Martin. Dave’s biggest hit single for Jin. Covered by Johnny Winter in 1980 and by Doug Sahm with Augie Meyers in 1983. Backed with…
Alone 45
“Alone” by Rockin’ Dave Allen and the Thunderbirds, Jin Records J-7393, 1960, written by D. Stich and P. O’Keefe (Dave Allen and Paula O’Keefe), Flat Town Music and Crazy Cajun Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, tenor saxophones: Miller (Jimmy) Norman and Tim Taylor, trombones: Vernon Drozd and Brian McWhirter, bass: Howard Cox, drums: Tom Martin, claves: Joey Long. “Alone” featured innovative rhythm changes that rendered it difficult to appreciate on the dance floor, but it remains one of Dave’s most interesting compositions.


Those Lonely Lonely Feelings 45
“Those Lonely, Lonely Feelings” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Jin Records J-7414, 1961, written by Vincent and King (Johnny Vincent and Earl King), Ace Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: “King” Cotton Williams, tenor saxophones: Jerry Woods and Tim Taylor, trombones: Vernon Drozd and Brian McWhirter, bass: Howard Cox, drums: Nick Ortega. Similar to, but not to be confused with, another Vincent and King song, “Those Lonely, Lonely Nights,” this recording also proved popular with Dave’s core audience. Dave’s last single for Jin, backed with…
My Little Darling
“My Little Darling” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Jin Records J-7415, 1961, written by D. Stich (Dave Allen), Flat Town Music and Crazy Cajun Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, piano: Kenny Lund, tenor saxophone: Miller (Jimmy) Norman, trombones: Vernon Drozd and Brian McWhirter, bass: Howard Cox, drums: Tom Martin. It’s fitting that Dave’s last recording for Jin should be a polished slow blues with a solid guitar section in the bridge, and a precursor of things to come.

Irene
“Irene” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Eric Records E-450, 1964, written by J. Miller and B. Jolivet, Excellorec Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown. The two Rockin’ Dave Allen singles produced by Huey P. Meaux for Eric, one of Meaux’s many labels over the years, are not as well known as the Jin singles. Dave’s voice had begun to change from the clear tenor of his early songs to a deeper, more mature timbre that would better serve the hard-edged blues material he would begin to embrace. Backed with…
Forever Trying To Change My Ways
“Forever Trying to Change My Ways” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Eric Records E-451, 1964, written by King Hill, Crazy Cajun Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown. Stuart King Hill was a friend of Dave’s in the early ’60s but is better known to football fans as a NFL quarterback, most notably for the Philadelphia Eagles.


Carol My Darling
“Carol My Darling” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Eric Records E-466, 1964, written by D. Stich (Dave Allen), Crazy Cajun Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown. Backed with…
Just To Hold My Hand
“Just to Hold My Hand” by Rockin’ Dave Allen, Eric Records E-467, 1964, written by Perryman and Robey (Paul Perryman and Don Robey, although Duke record label owner Robey has been long been accused of unfairly taking writing credits), Lion Publishing. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown. Previously recorded by Paul Perryman for Duke in 1956 and by Clyde McPhatter for Atlantic in 1957. Dave would essentially drop the “Rockin’” from his stage name shortly after the release of this single.

Hopeless Love
“Hopeless Love” by Jimmy Rogers, International Artists IA-188-A, 1967, written and produced by David Allen Stich (Dave Allen), Tapier Music. Vocal: Jimmy Rogers, guitar: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown. Prior to the recording of Color Blind, Dave wrote, produced and played guitar on both sides of this International Artists single. Rogers was a bassist who had played in nightclubs with Dave, and who possessed a distinctive singing voice reminiscent of Van Morrison. Not to be confused with Chicago blues guitarist Jimmy Rogers, who played with Muddy Waters and released several seminal blues records of his own. Backed with…
Jimmy's Blue
“Jimmy’s Blue” by Jimmy Rogers, International Artists IA-188-B, 1967, written and produced by David Allen Stich (Dave Allen), Tapier Music. Vocal: Jimmy Rogers, guitar: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown.

I Became The Songs I Sang “(I Became) The Songs I Sang” by (Rockin’) Dave Allen, Big Orange Records 1005A, 1979, written by D. Stich (Dave Allen), Little Navel Music. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown, produced by Dave Allen. Although already beginning to suffer the effects of ill health that would follow him the rest of his life, Dave acted as producer and arranger for this short-lived Houston label. Mel Douglas (of the Nu-Notes), who had previously recorded “Cadillac Boogie” and “Flipped for You,” was also a member of the Big Orange roster. Backed with…
Shirley Jean
“Shirley Jean” by (Rockin’) Dave Allen, Big Orange Records 1005B, 1979, written by W. Price (“Big” Walter Price), Lion Publishing. Guitar and vocal: Dave Allen, backing musicians unknown, produced by Dave Allen. A country-tinged reworking of one of Dave’s early Jin hits. Dave’s last known audio recording.

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